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The 2002 Fall Conference:
Celebrating Science in the Study of Reading:
From Research to Practice

Friday, October 11, 2002
8 :00 AM. - 4:00 P.M.
NEW LOCATION: Radisson Hotel
Route One and Old Lincoln Highway, Trevose, PA
Exit 28 on the Pennsylvania Turnpike

Presented by
The International Dyslexia Association,
Greater Philadelphia Branch
and
Widener University,
The Institute for Graduate Clinical Psychology

Telephone (610) 527-1548      Fax (610) 527-5011
E-mail: dyslexia@PBIDA..org
Pittsburg Regional Group  (412) 635-5270

Keynote Address: G. Reid Lyon
Conference Program
Participants
The Janet L. Hoopes Award

Keynote Address

In Celebration of Science in the Study of Reading Development, Reading Difficulties, and Reading Instruction
G. Reid Lyon, Ph.D.

This presentation will summarize the converging evidence on how children learn to read, why some children have difficulty doing so, and what teachers and parents can do to prevent and remediate reading disabilities. An emphasis will be placed on early identification strategies and the implementation of early intervention programs that have been found to be effective for well defined groups of children.

G. Reid Lyon, Ph.D. is a research psychologist and the Chief of the Child Development and Behavior Branch within the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. He is responsible for the direction, development and management of research programs in developmental psychology, cognitive neuroscience, behavioral pediatrics, reading, and human learning and learning disorders.

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Conference Program

11:00am

MORNING SESSIONS A-H

  A. The Development of Reading Fluency and Comprehension: The New Frontier
Speaker: G. Reid Lyon, Ph.D.
This presentation will focus on recent research that has identified factors that contribute to dysfluent reading comprehension fluency and its impact on reading comprehension. A summary of findings on the effects of different reading intervention programs on fluency will also be presented.
Chair: Leslie Rescorla, Ph.D., Director, Child Study Institute, Bryn Mawr College

B. Fluency for Comprehension: The Role of Phonemic Awareness, Orthography, Rapid Naming and Rhythm Speaker: Pamela E. Hook, Ph.D.
The focus of this session will be on the role of phonological awareness, orthographic processing and rapid serial naming in the acquisition of automatic word recognition skills and the role of syntactic chunking in fluency development. The importance of these processes throughout the stages of reading development will be examined. Formal and informal assessment measures will be described as well as specific strategies for remediation. Patterns of strengths and weaknesses within individual students and the relative effects on reading ability will be highlighted.
Chair: Charles Lange, Director of Special Services, Council Rock School District

C. Advocacy: Knowing the Child is More Important than Knowing the Law
Speaker: G. Emerson Dickman, Esq.
The legal right to an appropriate education is a false promise if you don't know what constitutes the appropriate education to which you have a right. It is like having the right to vote without knowing the candidates or their political positions. Whether a teacher or parent, knowing the child is the key to successful advocacy and intervention.
Chair: Dr. Wallace H. Wallace, Ph.D., Chairperson, Achievement House, Bryn Mawr

D. Becoming A Strategic Reader: Linking Assessment to Comprehension Instruction
Speaker: Eileen Marzola, Ed.D.
Techniques for detecting students' weaknesses in reading comprehension plus the most effective research-validated strategies designed to improve literal and inferential comprehension will be presented during this hands-on session.
Chair: Meredith Denovan, Language Arts Coordinator, Upper Dublin School District

E. Evidence-Based Reading Instruction for the Older Learner: What Does the Research Say?
Speaker: John Kruidenier, Ed.D.
A group of experts, sponsored by the National Institute for Literacy and the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy, recently completed a review of adolescent and adult reading instruction research. Participants in this session will review the results from this research and discuss practical, evidence-based approaches to teaching reading to older learners.
Chair: Mabeebah Ali, PBIDA member, adult with dyslexia

F. Orton-Gillingham: Philosophy and Practices
Speaker: Candace R. Bedrock, MA, LDT-C

This presentation will discuss the principles that undergird multisensory teaching. Participants will be led through a basic lesson plan which will enable them to see the basic principles at work.
Chair: Kay Lewis, Director of Curriculum, Woodbridge School District, Greenwood, DE

G. Structuring the Writing Process for Students with Learning Disabilities
Speaker: Timothy Lackaye, Ed. D

This presentation examines strategies used in a structured writing process approach to teaching writing, and additions to the writing process. Case studies are presented.
Chair: Melissa L. Vosburgh, Former Head of St. Peter's School, Private Tutor, Strafford

H. Non-Verbal Learning Disabilities
Speaker: James L. Thomas, Ph.D.

An overview of non-verbal learning disabilities will be presented, and will be contrasted to what we ordinarily think of as learning disabilities. The underlying hypothesized neuroanatomy will be presented, along with the typical profile in terms of neuropsychological test results.
Chair: Mary Lazar, Psy.D., Pediatric Neuropsychologist, Private Practice, Bala Cynwyd.

2:00pm

AFTERNOON SESSIONS I-P

  I. Findings of The National Reading Panel:
From Theory to Practice

Speakers: Dottie Mazullo, M.Ed. and Jennifer Cordivari, M.S. Ed.
This session will summarize the core findings of the National Reading Panel by suggesting implications for classroom instruction and describing proven strategies for teaching reading skills. Research-based information about the 5 areas of reading instruction will be shared. The Crossroads School has been an innovator in the use of language-based learning instruction.
Chair: Nancy C. Jennings, Director, The Reading Connection, Springhouse and Yardley, PA

J. Fluency for Comprehension: The Role of Phonemic Awareness, Orthography, Rapid Naming, and Rhythm
Speaker: Pamela E. Hook, Ph.D.
The focus of this session will be on the role of phonological awareness, orthographic processing and rapid serial naming in the acquisition of automatic word recognition skills and the role of syntactic chunking in fluency development. The importance of these processes throughout the stages of reading development will be examined. Formal and informal assessment measures will be described as well as specific strategies for remediation. Patterns of strengths and weaknesses within individual students and the relative effects on reading ability will be highlighted.
Chair: Nancy L. Ehrlich, M.Ed., Director, Centre Square Academy, Blue Bell, PA

K. Urban Kindergarten Reading Project
Speaker: Michael Bend, Ph.D.
This workshop will describe a highly effective reading project undertaken over the last 5 years at a nearby urban kindergarten center serving a predominantly African American population, many of whom qualify for free and reduced lunch. At the end of the year, average reading scores are at the first grade level. The presentation will consist of a brief overview of the students' recent test results, followed by a description of the instructional strategies and materials used.
Chair: Winnie Carlsson, M.Ed., Kindergarten Teacher, Chestnut Hill Academy

L. Memory and School Success
Speaker: Claire Wurtzel, M.S. Ed.
This session will provide an understanding of the memory demands that academic learning make on students of all ages. Suggested methods and strategies will be presented to help improve memory as well as ways to circumvent memory weaknesses across all age levels and content areas. Interactive, hands-on activities will highlight aspects of memory and prompt ideas about participants' memory profiles. How these learning profiles can help in lesson planning to support all learners will be emphasized.
Chair: Marjorie del Bello, Assistant Superintendent for Pupil Services and Special Education, Garnet Valley School District

M. Wilson Literacy Solutions: Prevention-Intervention-Intensive-Specialized Instruction
Speaker: Barbara A. Wilson, M.Ed.
This session relates the Wilson Reading System to research findings and describes effective delivery models for students who struggle with reading. Participants will gain skills to help bring reading research into practice. Wilson Foundations for grades K-3 is now available for prevention in the general education classroom. This will be discussed as well as intervention programs utilizing on-line education, and intensive programs with Wilson certified teachers.
Chair: Barbara Finkel, Special Education Teacher and Liaison, School District of Philadelphia

N. Algebra: A Hands On Approach
Speaker: Harley A. Tomey, III , M.Ed.
This presentation will provide an understanding of the skills and problems the individual with dyslexia brings to mathematics as well as demonstrate teaching strategies moving from the concrete to the abstract. Topics to be covered include: an understanding of procedural and conceptual knowledge in mathematics, the concepts behind the four basic operations, operations involving positive and negative numbers, and solving/simplifying algebraic equations.
Chair: Ginny Renzi-Blair, M.Ed., Math and Learning Specialist, Private Practice, Radnor

O. The Role of Anxiety in the Lives of Children and Adolescents with Developmental-Neurobehavioral Disorders
Speaker: Anthony L. Rostain, M.D.
This presentation will review current research on the comorbidity of anxiety and developmental-neurobehavioral disorders; will discuss ways to identify, diagnose and treat anxiety; and will suggest strategies for reducing the prevalence and severity of anxiety disorders in at-risk individuals.
Chair: Lisa Goldstein, M.D., Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, Private Practice, Rosemont

P. Using Children's Literature to Develop Language Skills
Speaker: Roberta Stacey, M. Ed.
Countless students who are otherwise bright, get tripped up by seemingly minor linguistics "rocks in the road" that cause them to stumble; for example, hearing "Harvard seals," when the teacher actually said, "harbor seals." This presentation is intended to spotlight these crucial, but less attention-getting linguistics trip-ups, while also providing strategies for remediation. In addition, strategies are suggested for helping middle-school students share what they know about literature in a coherent manner. Organizational templates and a literature list for middle schoolers will be provided.
Chair: Adele Gerber, M.A., CCC/SLP, Professor Emeritus, Temple University

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Participants

Candace R. Bedrock , M.A., LDT-C, Director of Curriculum and Support, Reading Assist Institute, Delaware

Michael Bend , Ph.D. President, ABeCeDarian Company, Wilmington, DE

Jennifer Cordivari , M.S., Ed., School Psychologist and Education Director, The Crossroads School, Paoli, PA

G. Emerson Dickman , Esq., Attorney and Education Advocate in Private Practice, Maywood, NJ

Pamela E. Hook , Ph.D., Associate Professor, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA

John R. Kruidenier , Ed.D, Educational Consultant, Rosemont, PA

Timothy Lackaye , Ed.D., Assistant Professor, Hunter College, New York, NY

G. Reid Lyon , Ph.D., Research psychologist and the Chief of the Child Development and Behavior Branch within the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland.

Eileen Marzola
, Ed.D., Educational Consultant, New York, NY

Dottie Mazullo , M.Ed., Assistant Head, The Crossroads School, Paoli, PA

Anthony L. Rostain , M.D., Director of Education, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Roberta Stacey , M.Ed., Co-Chair, Oral Expression/Literature Department and Consulting Speech-Language Pathologist for The Landmark School, Prides Crossing, MA

James L. Thomas , Ph.D., Clinical Psychologist and neuropsychologist on the faculty of NYU Medical Center and Brain Research Lab, New York City

Harley A. Tomey , III, M.Ed., Education Specialist, Learning Disabilities, Virginia Department of Education, President of the International Dyslexia Association

Barbara A. Wilson , M.Ed., Director, Wilson Language Training, Millbury, MA

Claire Wurtzel , M.S., Ed., Director, General/Special Education Initiatives in Schools, Bank Street College, New York, NY

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The Janet L. Hoopes Award

The Janet L. Hoopes Award was initiated by the Board of Directors of the Philadelphia Branch of the International Dyslexia Association in 1993. It is presented each year at the Fall Conference to an individual or individuals in the Greater Philadelphia area who have made a significant contribution to the education of people with learning differences.

R ECIPIENT OF THE J ANET L. H OOPES A WARD FOR 2001
Dr. J. Barton Harrison, Esquire

The Philadelphia Branch of the International Dyslexia Association is pleased to present the Janet L. Hoopes Award to J. Barton Harrison, Esq. When he was in first grade at the School in Rose Valley, Mr. Harrison experienced significant learning weaknesses in reading, spelling, and written expression. Diagnosed as having dyslexia, Mr. Harrison received intensive tutorial support from Margaret Rawson, a teacher at the school who became a pioneer in the identification and teaching of students with dyslexia. It was under her guidance that Mr. Harrison mastered the important academic skills needed to become a successful attorney, a corporate executive of several companies, and a valued private consultant.

Mr. Harrison began working with Ms. Rawson when his teachers realized that he was not learning any of the readiness skills presented to him. Tutored for an hour every day after school, Mr. Harrison recalls looking longingly at those classmates who were playing outdoors, as he attempted to associate each letter of the alphabet with its particular sound. During his academic career he also developed appropriate compensatory skills and mastered those strategies needed to be successful. He attended Oberlin College on a full academic scholarship and earned his law degree from the University of Pennsylvania Law School, where he was a member of the Law Review.

Mr. Harrison has had an untiring dedication to the International Dyslexia Association and in particular to the Philadelphia Branch, where he has served as a board member for nine years. He is presently Chair of the Fundraising Committee for the 2004 International IDA Conference which will be held in Philadelphia.

Mr. Harrison is an important role model for youngsters who have academic disabilities, for he demonstrates that, given appropriate help, perseverance, diligence, motivation, and determination can result in addressing and resolving learning issues. Through his accomplishments, Mr. Harrison is an inspiration to others that they, too can overcome academic adversity and succeed.

Past Recipients of the Janet L. Hoopes Award

Janet L. Hoopes, Ph.D. - 1993
Virginia Biasotto - 1994
Joan Frank, M.Ed. - 1995
Barbara Lorry, Ph.D. - 1996
Thomas Atkins, Ph.D. - 1997
Katherine Gordon-Clark, Ph.D. - 1998
Dorothy Flanagan & Sandra Howze - 1999
Jean Bay - 2000
Dr. Elissa L. and Rev. James H. Fisher, 2001

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