HOME  
 





Link to National IDA Join IDA




 

2014 Annual Conference

The Next Generation of Reading Science: Proven and Developing Trends in Literacy

Pennsylvania Branch of the IDA
Co-Sponsors: Delaware Valley Friends School, Learning Ally, Wilson Language Training, Stratford Friends School, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Date: Friday, October 10, 2014
Time: 8:00 am - 3:15 pm
LOCATION:The Delaware Valley Friends School
19 East Central Avenue Paoli, PA 19301 (610-640-4150)
www.dvfs.org


Keynote Address
Conference Program
The Janet L. Hoopes Award
Continuing Education Credits (Act 48, APA, ASHA)
Directions, Parking and Accommodations
Conference Participants
Exhibits and Advertising
Full Brochure
ONLINE REGISTRATION: Sign Up Now!

Keynote Address

Kenneth Pugh, Ph.D.
Neuroimaging Studies of Reading and Development and Reading Disability:  An Update on Recent Findings.

Kenneth R. Pugh, Ph.D., is President and Director of Research, Haskins Laboratories, a Yale University and University of Connecticut affiliated inter-disciplinary institute, dedicated to the investigation of the biological bases of language. He also holds academic appointments as a Professor of Psychology, University of Connecticut, Associate Professor of Linguistics, Yale University, Associate Professor of Diagnostic Radiology at Yale University School of Medicine, and Director of the Yale Reading Center. His research program falls primarily in two broad domains:  cognitive neuroscience and psycholinguistics. A fundamental interest continues to be research into the neurobiology of typical and atypical language and reading development in children. 

 Reading disability (RD) has been characterized as a brain-based difficulty in acquiring fluent decoding skill, associated (in alphabetic languages at least) with problems in operating on the phonological structures of language. We present findings from ongoing studies in our lab which indicate that RD children and adolescents fail to develop a coherent left hemisphere reading circuitry, consisting of distributed cortical and subcortical networks, that in typically developing (TD) readers comes online to support fluent word reading. With regard to neuroplasticity and remediation, treatment studies from our group and others have examined the influence of intensive reading remediation in at-risk children and adolescents, revealing substantial gains in both reading scores and corresponding development of key LH reading networks for readers afforded this treatment.  Moreover, recent extensions of learning studies with older RD readers continue to suggest a high degree of plasticity in this age-range. Finally, we present new findings from an ongoing longitudinal study that reveal important gene-brain-behavior relations in young children at risk for RD. We will also discuss new methodological developments for gene-brain-behavior research, and new directions in research on reading including recent studies of learning and consolidation, and second language literacy acquisition.

My research examines the brain basis of reading disability (RD). Ongoing longitudinal studies reveal key differences in the brain systems that develop for reading in RD children, and treatment studies, conducted to date, indicate that effective interventions can significantly impact on these brain differences.

Objectives: To develop a working familiarity with cognitive neuroscience and how new tools can inform understanding of diagnosis and remediation of reading disabilities.


back to top

Conference Program

 

8:00 am Registration and Exhibits
Continental Breakfast
9:00 am

Welcome        
Julia Sadtler, PBIDA  President

Janet L. Hoopes Award Presentation

9:15 am

Keynote Address
Kenneth Pugh, Ph.D.,
President and Director of Research, Haskins Laboratories
Recent advances in brain imaging have provided a new window into reading development. We summarize recent work from our lab and others on the neural circuits that support skilled reading, differences in children with reading disability and the impact of treatment on these circuits. New longitudinal studies chart key gene-brain-behavior pathways in children at risk for reading problems.
This program is co-sponsored by the Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists and PBIDA.  The Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor Continuing Education for psychologists. The Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists maintains responsibility for the program and its content. This program provides 1.5 Hours of CE credits for Psychologists.”

10:45 am

Exhibits, Coffee

11:15 am

MORNING SESSIONS

 
AM 1:  Meaning and Implications of the Neuroimaging Studies: A Deeper Look
Kenneth Pugh, Ph.D., President and Director of Research, Haskins Laboratories.
This session will provide opportunity for a deeper look at the neuroimaging studies described in the keynote speech and their implications for intervention. Those attending are encouraged to participate and to bring questions from their professional experience.
Session Focus:  Informational

AM 2:  Tests of Reading Comprehension: The Quest for the Holy Grail
Melissa Lee Farrall,
PhD, SAIF, Adjunct Faculty, Simmons College.
There are many different ways to measure reading comprehension, and despite differences in structure, language, and content we often treat these tests as though they were the same. Participants in this workshop will learn how differences in tests of reading comprehension can affect a student’s performance. Standardized tests will be compared and contrasted from the perspective of the publisher’s view of reading comprehension, and how text selection and the question types provide a window into the mind of the reader. In the end, participants will learn how to make good decisions regarding test selection and interpretation as a path to meaningful recommendations for identification and instruction.

Session Focus: Practical
This program is co-sponsored by the Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists and PBIDA.  The Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor Continuing Education for psychologists. The Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists maintains responsibility for the program and its content. This program provides 1.5 Hours of CE credits for Psychologists.”

AM 3:  Teaching Sentence-Level Writing Skills to Students with Writing Difficulties and Learning Disabilities Shawn Datchuk, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Special Education at the University of Vermont.
Richard M. Kubina Jr.,
Ph.D., BCBA-D, Professor of Special Education at The Pennsylvania State University.
Many students, including students with learning disabilities and writing difficulties, struggle with sentence-level writing skills.  Sentence-level writing skills include handwriting, spelling, grammar/usage, and construction of simple and more complex sentence types. Acquisition and fluency of multiple sentence-level writing skills can positively impact continued writing development. This session will present a review of the writing intervention literature, highlight key instructional and practice routines for acquisition and fluency, and discuss the contribution of sentence-level writing skills to continued writing development.

Session Focus:  Research

 
AM 4: Linguistic Function Relative to Cognition and Learning: A Cognitive-Linguistic Perspective on Language and Speech Evaluations
Lydia H. Soifer,
Ph.D., CCC-SLP, Director, The Soifer Center for Learning and Child Development; Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine.
Good oral language skills are essential to literacy development and academic success.  A properly performed language evaluation can provide valuable information for educators in developing an appropriate IEP and preparing lessons for a student with a learning disability.  This presentation will define and describe what is essential to include in quality language evaluations and how to use this information in your classrooms to facilitate successful learning and teaching.

Session Focus: Practical
This program is co-sponsored by the Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists and PBIDA.  The Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor Continuing Education for psychologists. The Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists maintains responsibility for the program and its content. This program provides 1.5 Hours of CE credits for Psychologists.”
 
AM 5: Early Literacy Preparation at the University Level
Lori Severino, Ed.D.,
Assistant Clinical Professor, Program Director Special Education, Drexel University.
Carolyn Berenato, Ed.D.,
Assistant Professor, Special Education Department, St. Joseph’s University.
Many beginning teachers share frustration at not feeling prepared to teach struggling readers. This session will discuss the necessary ingredients for schools of education to provide to elementary education pre-service teachers in order to prepare them to effectively teach reading to all students. The session will cover content, field experiences, supervision, and professional development.

Session Focus:  Practical

AM 6: Use of the WISC-V in Reading Disability Assessments
George McCloskey, Ph.D.,
Professor and Director of School Psychology Research, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine.
This presentation will discuss the likely content and structure of the yet to be published WISC-V and a neuropsychological assessment model for the identification of learning disabilities.  Emphasis will be placed on the role of specific WISC-V subtests in the assessment of reading disabilities from a neuropsychological perspective.
Session Focus: Practical
This program is co-sponsored by the Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists and PBIDA.  The Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor Continuing Education for psychologists. The Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists maintains responsibility for the program and its content. This program provides 1.5 Hours of CE credits for Psychologists.”

AM 7:  Reading and the Brain
Timothy Odegard, Ph.D.,
Director of Research and Evaluation, Wilson Language Training.
This presentation reviews foundational reading skills, the distributed brain networks that carry them out, and differences observed in individuals with developmental dyslexia.

Session Focus:  Research
 
 
AM 8: Assistive Technologies in the Classroom: A Hands-On Demonstration
Dave Brubaker, M.A., Academic Systems Director, Delaware Valley Friends School.
This session is a live, hands-on, interactive presentation of assistive technology for dyslexia and other LD  issues by students from the Delaware Valley Friends School.  Students will demonstrate their use of technology and answer questions on how they incorporate these assistive technologies into their daily school and study lives.
Session Focus: Practical

AM 9: Evidence-Based Strategies to Teach Mathematical Problem Solving to Students with Learning Disabilities
Jugnu Agrawal, Ph.D.,
Curriculum Resource Teacher, Fairfax County Public Schools; Adjunct Faculty, George Mason University.
Lisa L. Morin, M.Ed.
, Ph.D. candidate and LD teacher, Old Dominion University.
The concrete-representational-abstract instructional sequence helps to develop conceptual and procedural knowledge of mathematical concepts. Research supports best practices for teaching the concrete and representational components of the sequence in order to transition to the final, abstract component, including the merging of schematic-based instruction and cognitive strategy instruction within the CRA framework. This presentation will address these strategies and provide opportunity for practical, hands-on training.
Session Focus: Practical

AM 10:  Executive Functions Part 1:  What Are They and Why Are They Important?
Cheryl Ann Chase, Ph.D.,
Clinical Psychologist, Private Practice, Cleveland, OH
“Executive Functions” is a term used to describe a broad set of cognitive skills that, when working properly, allow students to manage impulses, work in a deliberate and thoughtful manner, and organize their time and materials.  When development of these skills is delayed, as is often the case in those with learning disabilities, ADHD, or emotional disorders, academic performance suffers, but for reasons not fully understood.  For example, a student with dyslexia, although receiving intensive reading intervention, continues to receive low grades in school because she does not consistently turn in her homework.  When working with students who have special educational needs, it is imperative that professionals also consider whether or not the student is displaying age-appropriate executive skills; additional assessment and intervention may be necessary.  This workshop will define the term “executive functioning” using clear, easy to understand terms.  It will also draw the connection between  executive functioning and academics, highlighting the ways in which executive dysfunction can negatively impact learning and performance.

Session Focus:  Informational
This program is co-sponsored by the Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists and PBIDA.  The Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor Continuing Education for psychologists. The Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists maintains responsibility for the program and its content. This program provides 1.5 Hours of CE credits for Psychologists.”

AM 11 Parent Track: Children with Dyslexia: Your Rights to Orton Gillingham Instruction and other Effective Instruction
Sonja Kerr, J.D., M.S.,
Director, Disability Rights, Public Interest Law Center of Philadelphia.
This session will include an overview of the rights of children with dyslexia in the IEP process and will explicitly focus on strategies and methods by which parents and advocates can encourage school districts to utilize research-based Orton-Gillingham methods of instruction to teach children with dyslexia. The presenter will address the need to focus on the five components of the National Reading Panel in requests for appropriate instruction regardless of the “brand name” of the type of instruction.

Session Focus:  Informational
(CEU's not available)

 

AM 12 Parent Track:  Meeting the Needs of Struggling Readers: To Proficiency and Beyond!
Paul Edelblut,
Vice President of Education Solutions for Learning Ally.
For years we have seen the impact accessible instructional materials can have on individuals yet often challenges remain for wider adoption frustrating parents.  While small-scale studies have shown improvements in fluency and comprehension no large scale study had been undertaken to determine the outcomes of the provision of these materials.  Using data from more than 10 states, multiple grade levels, multiple years and across multiple subjects this paper reviews the impact of accessible instructional materials as measured by performance on statewide AYP exams.  Walk away with an understanding of data that will help you convince and engage your student’s school in bringing accessible instructional materials to the classroom.

Session Focus:  Informational
(CEU's not available)

1:45 pm

AFTERNOON SESSIONS

  
PM 1:  A New Conceptualization of Reading Fluency and Its Application in the Classroom
Stephanie Gottwald, Ph.D.
, Assistant Director of the Center for Reading and Language Research, Tufts University.
For many children the achievement of reading quickly and accurately enough to understand text remains an essential, but elusive goal.  Recent research questions the ability of repeated reading programs to improve reading fluency.  This talk will describe an alternative model of reading fluency and an intervention approach that directly instructs children in all areas of language that are involved in reading and the strategic knowledge needed for successful understanding of text.  The results of a randomized, treatment-control study verify the success of a multi-componential approach for severely impaired readers.
Session Focus:  Research
 
PM 2: Teaching Reading to Middle School Students with Reading Disabilities:  Results from Three Studies
Mary Beth Calhoon, Ph.D.
, Associate Professor of Special Education, University of Miami.
The purpose of this project was to examine group-and individual-level responses by struggling adolescents readers (6th -8th grades; N=155) to three different modalities of the same reading program, Reading Achievement Multi-Component Program (RAMP-UP).  The three modalities differ in the combination of reading components (phonological decoding, spelling, fluency, comprehension) that are taught and their organization.  Latent change scores were used to examine changes in phonological decoding, fluency, and comprehension for each modality at the group level.  In addition, individual students were classified as gainers versus non-gainers (a reading level increase of a year or more vs. less than one year) so that characteristics of gainers and differential sensitivity to instructional modality could be investigated.  Findings from both group and individual analyses indicted that reading outcomes were related to modalities of reading instruction.  Furthermore, differences in reading gains were seen between students who began treatment with higher reading scores than those with lower reading scores; dependent on modality of treatment.  Results, examining group and individual analyses similarities and differences, and the effect the different modalities have on reading outcomes for older struggling readers will be discussed.

Session Focus: Practical
 
PM 3:  The ‘Write’ Moves: Meeting the Challenge of Common Core Writing Standards
Linda Hecker, M.Ed.,
Lead Education Specialist, Landmark College Institute for Research and Training.
Whether or not your school has adopted Common Core Standards, contemporary education demands increasingly
sophisticated writing skills from all students. This session examines the impact of Common Core standards and 21st century skills on writing instruction and explores approaches that support students who learn differently to meet the challenge of high-level academic writing.
Session Focus: Practical
 
PM 4:  Language Problems and Their Impact in the Inclusionary Classroom
Lydia H. Soifer,
Ph.D., CCC-SLP, Director, The Soifer Center for Learning and Child Development; Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine.
Language is the vehicle for school but more and more students are presenting with language problems which have a significant impact on their classroom and social abilities. Common language deficits and their implications for academic and social success will be discussed and explained. Strategies and techniques will also be presented for teachers to facilitate language learning in an inclusionary classroom model.

Session Focus: Practical
This program is co-sponsored by the Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists and PBIDA.  The Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor Continuing Education for psychologists. The Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists maintains responsibility for the program and its content. This program provides 1.5 Hours of CE credits for Psychologists.”
 
PM 5:  Sleep Talk: Sleep and the Child with Learning Differences
Jennifer Keller, M.S.S., L.S.W
., Guidance Counselor, The Quaker School at Horsham.
Humans spend approximately one third of their lives sleeping, yet no one knows exactly why.  Sleep is an essential physiological need, however the quality and quantity of sleep varies greatly from person to person.  Current research includes much about sleep disorders; sleep in the young and elderly, and more recently, the link between sleep and mental health.  However, there is a relatively small amount of research regarding sleep and children with learning differences.  What research does exist points to a strong link between sleep quality, quantity and the effects of both on a child’s ability to learn, process, and retain information he or she has been exposed to during the day.  Studies in this area also point to an increased prevalence of certain sleep related disorders in this population.  This presentation will review the existing literature on sleep and children with learning differences, focusing on sleep disorders, the effects of sleep loss on learning, and strategies to improve sleep and sleep hygiene in this population.

Session Focus:  Informational
This program is co-sponsored by the Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists and PBIDA.  The Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor Continuing Education for psychologists. The Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists maintains responsibility for the program and its content. This program provides 1.5 Hours of CE credits for Psychologists.”
 
 
PM 6:  Comorbidity of ADHD and LD: DSM-5 Perspectives on Assessment and Treatment
C. Pace Ducket, M.D.,
Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, Private Practice, Bryn Mawr.
An update on the changes to the DSM-5 as it pertains to ADHD and LD. A review of the epidemiology of comorbid ADHD and LD with a focus on clinical conceptualization and its implications for treatment.

Session Focus:
Practical

This program is co-sponsored by the Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists and PBIDA.  The Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor Continuing Education for psychologists. The Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists maintains responsibility for the program and its content. This program provides 1.5 Hours of CE credits for Psychologists.”
 
 
PM 7: Listening & Note-taking!  Helping Students to Become Better Note-takers
Joseph R. Boyle, Ph.D.
, Associate Professor of Special Education, Temple University.
This session will present information about note-taking interventions and how teachers can improve the note-taking skills of students with LD.  Highlights include: note-taking problems encountered by students with LD in inclusive content-area classes, how teachers can assist students with note-taking, and the strategic note-taking app.
Session Focus:  Research
 
PM 8: Teaching to Automaticity
Kenneth U. Campbell,
Researcher, Author of Great Leaps materials.
Math is a language. Math fluency, the ability to perform mathematical tasks  easily and efficiently, must be taught. Great Leaps, noted for affordable simplicity, has the tool skills of math broken down into these areas:  numeration, addition, subtraction, multiplication division, fractions’ took skills, calculating fractions, decimals and percentages, working with positive and negative integers, order of operations and square roots and exponents.

Session Focus:  Product Presentation
(CEU's not available)

PM 9:  Executive Functions Part 2:  How Can I Help Students with Weak Executive Functioning?
Cheryl Ann Chase, Ph.D.,
Clinical Psychologist, Private Practice, Cleveland, OH.
Building upon the morning session by the same presenter, this session will use Barkley’s model as a platform for t
hinking about how to address executive function weakness.  It will also introduce the seven core principles for helping students with weak executive functioning as described by Dr. Christopher Kaufman.  These include:  providing “surrogate prefrontal lobe” support, teaching new skills/content explicitly, teaching strategies and how they should be applied, minimizing demands on working memory, providing opportunities for guided practice, keeping things predictable, and anticipating aspects of tasks that students may find difficult.  Finally, many concrete strategies will be offered that can be used to support a child with weak executive functioning both at home and in school.
Session Focus: Practical
This program is co-sponsored by the Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists and PBIDA.  The Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor Continuing Education for psychologists. The Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists maintains responsibility for the program and its content. This program provides 1.5 Hours of CE credits for Psychologists.” 
 
PM 10Parent Track: Survival Guide for College-bound LD Students
David Carson, Author.

David Carson will discuss his journey from grade school through college. He will use his real life experiences to show students, parents, and educators that the next great wave of diversity for colleges is students with learning disabilities. The skills and coping strategies it takes for youth/young adults to succeed in college will be reviewed.

Session Focus:  Informational 
(CEU's not available)

PM 11Parent Track:

Experience Dyslexia®: A Simulation
Lisa Goldstein, M.D.,
Private Practice
Eugenie Flaherty, Ph.D.
The Simulation experience challenges participants to learn and to demonstrate knowledge under conditions which mimic having a learning disability such as dyslexia, and increases participants’ understanding of the profound impact of dyslexia. In this lively and thought-provoking  program, participants will take part in six simulated activities which mimic the experiences and processing of those with dyslexia.  The program ends with participants asking questions of an experienced panel.

(CEU’s are not available)
This program is co-sponsored by the Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists and PBIDA.  The Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor Continuing Education for psychologists. The Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists maintains responsibility for the program and its content. This program provides 2 Hours of CE credits for Psychologists.” 

 

 

 

 


back to top

The Janet L. Hoopes Award

This prestigious award was established in 1993 in honor of the late Dr. Janet L. Hoopes, professor emeritus of Education and Child Development at Bryn Mawr College and former Director of the Child Study Institute at Bryn Mawr College. She was a former Board Member of the PBIDA, a former board president of the Children’s Aid Society of Pennsylvania, and former Chair of the Board of the Hill Top Preparatory School in Rosemont.

The Hoopes Award is given to an individual or individuals from Pennsylvania or Delaware who have made a significant contribution to the advancement of the education of those with learning differences.

Our past recipients are:

1993 Janet L. Hoopes
1994 Virginia Biasotto
1995 Joan Frank
1996 Barbara Lorry
1997 Thomas Atkins
1998 Katherine Gordon-Clark
1999 Dorothy Flanagan and Sandra Howze
2000 Jean Bay
2001 Elissa L. And Rev. James H. Fisher
2002 J. Barton Harrison
2003 Elizabeth P. Simon
2004 National IDA Conference in Phila. (no award given)
2005 Adele Gerber
2006 Charna O. Axelrod
2007 Sharon Tomalin
2008 Fran James-Warkomski
2009 Reading for the Blind and Dyslexic (RFB&D)
2010 Kathleen Hunt
2011 George Rowe
2012  Irene McHenry, Ph.D.
2013  Eugenie Walsh Flaherty, Ph.D.


back to top

Continuing Education Credits (Act 48, APA, ASHA)

Act 48:  Pennsylvania Department of Education’s Act 48 will award four and one-half (4.5) Act 48 Credits through Stratford Friends School.  $15 processing fee payable with registration.

APA:  To view education objectives for each session for which American Psychological Association CE credits are given, click here.

This program is co-sponsored by the Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists and the Pennsylvania Branch of the International Dyslexia Association (PBIDA). The Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor Continuing Education for psychologists. The Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychologists maintains responsibility for the program and its content. This program is offered for up to 1.5, 3.0, 4.5 and 5.0 Hours of CE credits for Psychologists.

  

ASHA: This program is offered for up to .4 CEUs (Intermediate levels, Professional area).

Continuing Education Fees:
Act 48:   $15.00
APA:          $5 per credit
ASHA:    $0
 

Please note:  CEU's are not available for the parent track.

 


back to top

Directions, Parking and Accommodations

Directions
Delaware Valley Friends School

      19 E. Central Avenue
       Paoli, Pennsylvania 19301

Using SEPTA
Take Septa’s Paoli/Thorndale train. Delaware Valley Friends School is an easy two block walk from the Paoli station (follow the signs).

Using the Schuylkill Expressway
Take the Schuylkill Expressway, I-76, West to:

  • US 202 South at King of Prussia (2nd 202 exit)
  • US 202 South 3.1 miles to Paoli Exit (2nd 252 exit)
  • PA 252 South 2.3 miles to E. Central Avenue (Paoli Point on corner)
  • Turn Right onto E. Central Avenue,
  • After .4 mile turn left
  • First left into DVFS Visitors Parking lot

Using US 202 South
Take US 202 South (Dekalb Pike) until it becomes the 202 Expressway at King of Prussia

  • US 202 South 3.1 miles to Paoli Exit (2nd 252 exit)
  • PA 252 South 2.3 miles to E. Central Avenue
  • Turn Right onto E. Central Avenue,
  • After .4 mile turn left
  • First left into DVFS Visitors Parking lot

Using US 202 North
Take US 202 North (Concord Pike or Wilmington - West Chester Pike) until it becomes the US 202-322 West Chester Bypass

  • US 202 Expressway exits right from the Bypass north of West Chester
  • US 202 North 10.4 mile to Swedesford Road
  • Right turn at bottom of ramp onto Swedesford Road
  • Proceed .3 mile to PA Route 252 South
  • Right turn onto PA 252 South for 1.2 miles to East Central Avenue
  • Turn Right onto E. Central Avenue,
  • After .4 mile turn left
  • First left into DVFS Visitors Parking lot

Using the PA Turnpike
PA Turnpike to Valley Forge Interchange #24, Schuykill Expressway, I-76 East

  • After Toll Booth, 2nd right turn onto US 202 South at King of Prussia
  • US 202 South 3.1 miles to Paoli Exit (2nd 252 exit)
  • PA 252 South 2.3 miles to E. Central Avenue
  • Turn Right onto E. Central Avenue,
  • After .4 mile turn left
  • First left into DVFS Visitors Parking lot

Using 422 East - Pottstown Expressway Extension (aka The County Line Expressway)
US 422 East to the US 202 South Expressway

  • US 202 South 2.4 miles to Paoli Exit (2nd 252 exit)
  • PA 252 South 2.3 miles to E. Central Avenue
  • Turn Right onto E. Central Avenue,
  • After .4 mile turn left
  • First left into DVFS Visitors Parking lot

Using US 30 West
Take US 30 West through Wayne, Devon and Berwyn to PA 252 North in Paoli

  • Right turn under train tracks onto PA 252 North
  • .2 mile to East Central Avenue
  • Left turn onto E. Central Avenue
  • After .4 mile turn left
  • First left into DVFS Visitors Parking lot

Using US 30 East
Take US 30 East through Fraser and Malvern to N. Valley Road in Paoli

  • Left turn before SEPTA station onto North Valley Road and over SEPTA tracks
  • Turn right onto East Central Avenue
  • After one block, turn right
  • First left into DVFS Visitors Parking lot

Using PA 252 North

  • Take 252 North through Media and Newtown Square to Paoli and US Route 30
  • Cross Route 30
  • Go under the train tracks, .2 mile to turn left on East Central Avenue
  • After .4 mile turn left
  • First left into DVFS Visitors Parking lot

 

ACCOMODATIONS:
A limited numbers of rooms have been held at a discounted rate for PBIDA conference attendees and exhibitors at The Desmond Hotel & Conference Center, One Liberty Boulevard, Malvern, PA. Contact the hotel directly at 800-575-1776 or 610-249-2116. Transportation to the conference will be available from the hotel.


back to top

Conference Participants

CONFERENCE FACULTY

Jugnu Agrawal, Ph.D.                                         

Carolyn Berenato, Ed.D.                                   

Joseph R. Boyle, Ph.D.                                      

Dave Brubaker, M.A.                                        

Mary Beth Calhoon, Ph.D.                                               

Kenneth U. Campbell                                        

David Carson                                      

Cheryl Ann Chase, Ph.D.                                  

Shawn Datchuk, Ph.D.                                      

C. Pace Ducket, M.D.                                        

Paul Edelbut                                        

Lisa L. Morin, M.Ed.                                          

Stephanie Gottwald, Ph.D.                                

Linda Hecker, M.Ed.                                         

Jennifer Keller, M.S.S., L.S.W.                                          

Sonja Kerr, J.D., M.S.                                         

Richard M. Kubina Jr., Ph.D.,                                 

George McCloskey, Ph.D.                                 

Lisa L. Morin, M.Ed.                                          

Timothy Odegard, Ph.D.                                   

Kenneth Pugh, Ph.D.                                          

Lori Severino, Ed.D.                                     

Lydia H. Soifer, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

 

 


back to top

Exhibits and Advertising

EXHIBIT AND ADVERTISING RESERVATIONS FOR

PBIDA’s 36th ANNUAL FALL CONFERENCE

You are cordially invited to participate in our Annual Fall Conference by reserving a table to present your organization or product and to place ads in our conference Ad Book. Once again, we are offering our exhibitors the opportunity to also place your ad in the Fall edition of our newsletter Focus. Please note that at last year’s conference we were not able to accommodate all exhibitors due to demand and space limitations; thus we encourage you to respond in a timely manner in order to reserve a space.

Our keynote speaker is Kenneth Pugh, Ph.D. President and Director of Research, Haskins Laboratories, a Yale University and University of Connecticut affiliated inter-disciplinary institute, dedicated to the investigation of the biological bases of language.  His research program falls primarily in two broad domains:  cognitive neuroscience and psycholinguistics. A fundamental interest continues to be research into the neurobiology of typical and atypical language and reading development in children. We will offer approximately 25 sessions or workshops, 4 of which will be geared specifically towards parents. The full program will be listed on www.pbida.org.

Delaware Valley Friends School (www.dvfs.org) is a Quaker school that services adolescents with learning differences in grades 6 -12. It is located on Philadelphia’s suburban Main Line and is on the Paoli/Thorndale train line of SEPTA.

A block of rooms have been reserved at The Desmond Hotel and Conference Center (www.desmondgv.com). The Desmond is less than 10 minutes from DVFS and has a shuttle service for guests. Please contact their reservations office at (800) 575-1776 and mention PBIDA when reserving your room.

Deadline for the Fall 2014 issue of Focus is June 30, 2014.

Deadline to reserve table(s) for the conference is September 20, 2014.

Please send .pdf or .jpg ads to dyslexia@pbida.org.

Deadline to reserve table(s) for the conference is September 19, 2014.

Click here for a reservation form.
If you have trouble with the link, email
dyslexia@pbida.org


back to top

Full Brochure

 

Click here for a printable conference brochure.


back to top

 


Home | About Dyslexia | Resources | Calendar
IDA Conferences | Focus Newsletter | Regional Groups | Contact Us


© 2005 PBIDA All Rights Reserved.